Search form

Media

These news clips on global space news are provided by the Coalition for Space Exploration for distribution by the Space Foundation to our constituents. You can also subscribe to receive a daily email version.

CSExtra – Thursday, August 9, 2012

To subscribe to CSExtra via RSS feed click here.

If you would prefer to receive CSExtra in e-mail format, e-mail us at [email protected] with the word SUBSCRIBE in the subject line.

Thursday’s CSExtra offers the latest reporting and commentary on space related activities from around the world. Apollo 11 commander Neil Armstrong recovers from heart by-pass surgery. NASA’s Mars Science Laboratory raises its camera mast in Gale Crater and sends back spectacular new images of the red planet. July heat sets a new U. S.  record. Russia to address worrisome Proton rocket launch loss. Why explore?  American astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson offers an articulate explanation. Los Angeles prepares an all star welcome for shuttle orbiter Endeavour. In England, radio astronomy pioneer Sir Bernard Lovell dies.

1. From The Associated Press via MSNBC.com: Neil Armstrong, Apollo 11 commander and the first man to walk on the moon, recovers from heart bypass surgery, according to his wife, Carol. Armstrong, now 82, and Buzz Aldrin touched down on the moon on July 20, 1969. NASA Administrator Charles Bolden sends best wishes for recovery. http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/48583851

2. From CBS News via Spaceflightnow.com: The Mars Science Laboratory check out in Gale Crater continues without major issue. The main camera mast was raised Wednesday, permitting new imagery of the rover’s alien surroundings.

http://www.spaceflightnow.com/mars/msl/120808mast/

A. From Space.com:  Gale Crater on Mars, or California’s Mojave Desert — the early images from MSL bear a striking resemblance, say scientists. http://www.space.com/16994-curiosity-rover-mars-photo-earth-like.html

B. From The Orlando Sentinel: “It’s the kind of mission that should remind us  and Congress  why the American space program is worth preserving and protecting,” the Florida newspaper notes in an editorial. “Americans are a curious people, and exploring the heavens appeals to our better nature.” http://www.orlandosentinel.com/news/opinion/os-ed-nasa-mars-curiosity-080912-20120808,0,5744055.story

C.  From Space.com: Why is Mars so orange? http://www.space.com/16999-mars-red-planet.html

4. From The New York Times: As many of the nation’s farmers might agree, July 2012 recorded the warmest temperatures in the lower 48 states of the U.S. than any month since 1895, according to the U. S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The 77.6 degree average exceeded by 3 degrees the July 1936 average. http://www.nytimes.com/2012/08/09/science/earth/july-was-hottest-month-ever-recorded-in-us.html?_r=1&ref=us

5. From Spacepolicyonline.com and Russian news agencies: Russian Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev calls a meeting for next week to look into the loss of a Proton rocket with Russian and Indonesian communications satellite. The recent loss was blamed on a previously troubled upper stage. Russia controls more than 50 percent of the global commercial launch market. http://www.spacepolicyonline.com/news/russian-rocket-industry-may-be-in-for-another-shakeup

6. From The National Post: Astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson, an articulate scientist and author, recalls the turmoil of his American upbringing in the 1960s and the significance of early human space exploration. http://fullcomment.nationalpost.com/2012/08/08/neil-degrasse-tyson-on-the-final-frontier-lets-see-whats-out-there/#3

7. From Spaceflightnow.com: The West Coast’s largest city prepares a major celebration to welcome the arrival of the NASA shuttle orbiter Endeavour. Endeavour is scheduled to arrive on Sept. 20.and make its way along a 12 mile parade route Oct. 12-13 to the California Museum of Science for public display. http://www.spaceflightnow.com/shuttle/sts134/120808csc/

8. From The New York Times: Sir Bernard Lovell, a pioneer in the field of radio astronomy, dies earlier this week in his native England. He was 98. Lovell’s observatory tracked Sputnik, the first man made satellite when it was launch in 1957. The former Soviet Union as well as the United States turned to Lovell to follow the small spacecraft as its transmitter died. http://www.nytimes.com/2012/08/08/science/space/sir-bernard-lovell-dies-at-98-a-radio-telescope-bears-his-name.html?_r=2&ref=science

Brought to you by the Coalition for Space Exploration, CSExtra is a daily compilation of space industry news selected from hundreds of online media resources.  The Coalition is not the author or reporter of any of the stories appearing in CSExtra and does not control and is not responsible for the content of any of these stories.  The content available through CSExtra contains links to other websites and domains which are wholly independent of the Coalition, and the Coalition makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy, completeness or authenticity of the information contained in any such site or domain and does not pre-screen or approve any content.   The Coalition does not endorse or receive any type of compensation from the included media outlets and is not responsible or liable in any way for any content of CSExtra or for any loss, damage or injury incurred as a result of any content appearing in CSExtra.  For information on the Coalition, visit www.spacecoalition.com or contact us via e-mail at [email protected].

<
Live Sun Image
 
X

Share This Page

Share this page with friends and bookmark for future reference.

Facebook Share on Facebook Twitter Tweet This LinkedIn Share on LinkedIn

Additional networks and bookmarking websites:

X

Give Us Feedback

We want to hear from you! Feel free to send us your comments about this page. General feedback for the Space Foundation is also welcome.